The governments of the following powers, referred to below, have decided to conclude an agreement to this end which, to the extent that their respective laws permit, would facilitate the exchange of information for the purpose of detecting and suppressing offences related to obscene publications and have, consequently, designated their plenipotentiarys, who met in Paris from 18 April to 4 May 1910. The treaty was concluded on 12 September 1923 in the form of an international convention for the fight against transport and transport in obscene publications and came into force on 7 August 1924. It was to complete the 1910 agreement on the repression of the dissemination of obscene publications. With the 1923 Convention, states agreed to criminalize the production, possession, importation, export, trade, advertising or display of “obscene characters, drawings, prints, paintings, prints, images, posters, emblems, photographs, camera films or other obscene objects.” Provide any information that may be useful to prevent the importation of publications of objects covered in paragraph 1 or to secure or expedite their seizure, to the extent that their respective laws permit; Each contracting state agrees to create or appoint an authority responsible for the obligation:1. coordination of all information that could facilitate the detection and control of acts that constitute violations of their domestic legislation concerning obscene writings, drawings, images or objects, where the various acts constituting the offence took place in different countries2; provide any information that may be useful to prevent the importation of publications or objects in advance, or to ensure or expedite their seizure, to the extent that their respective laws permit;3. Contracting governments communicate with each other, through the Government of the French Republic, the authority established or designated under this article, under the direction of the Government of the French Republic. The treaty was concluded in Paris on May 4, 1910 and was originally titled “Agreement for the Suppression of Obscene Publications.” The treaty was initially approved by a number of states, including France, Germany, Austria-Hungary, Russia and the United Kingdom. Through the treaty, states have agreed to appoint a government authority to exchange information on obscenity offences “where the various offences that constitute the offence have taken place in different countries.” The contract applied to “obscene writings, drawings, images or objects.”